The Simplicity of Repairing Power Tools Yourself

Repairing power tools yourself has never been easier than it is today thanks to the availability of power tool spare parts and manuals online. There was a time before the economic downturn when people would simply throw away power tools when they stopped working. But that’s wasteful. Those in the know realise that power tools generally only stop working due to a very limited number of reasons. Here they are, but please remember to isolate the tool from any power source before you begin to dismantle it for examination.

Power Cable  Most people would think to check the plug and maybe change the fuse, but if that doesn’t work they don’t think about the cable. Connections can work loose where the cable enters tool’s casing. Check this first, but if you suspect there may be break somewhere along the cable, check lengths of it with a meter until you find the continuity break. If this is close to one end or the other then simply cut it out and reattach the wires to the tool or plug end.  Many tools have a clamp to grip the cord where it enters the tool’s casing. If this is lacking a cable tie around the end of the cord within the casing will help to prevent the cord from being accidentally pulled free. Drive Belt These are usually the first things to go, and once you crack open the tool it’s a nice easy problem to spot. Belts can get worn and stretched, then they can overheat and end up getting shredded or stripped. You can spot this because the motor will be running but nothing is being driven.  Switch Powerful tools such as circular saws and grinders can wear out their switches quite easily. If you have to jiggle the switch a bit to get the motor to turn, then the switch is on its way out. Contacts can become charred and carbon coated and sometimes simply just need cleaning.  Brushes Some tools, such as grinders and routers, run at high loads and wear out their brushes quickly. Many power tools have snap fits and easy fastening assemblies and so can be opened up quickly and easily. When you have determined where the problem lies, do an online search for a parts diagram of the tool if you don’t have one to hand. From that get the part number and check out some online vendors of power tool spare parts. Why not give it a try? Most people would think to check the plug and maybe change the fuse, but if that doesn’t work they don’t think about the cable. Connections can work loose where the cable enters tool’s casing. Check this first, but if you suspect there may be break somewhere along the cable, check lengths of it with a meter until you find the continuity break. If this is close to one end or the other then simply cut it out and reattach the wires to the tool or plug end.  Many tools have a clamp to grip the cord where it enters the tool’s casing. If this is lacking a cable tie around the end of the cord within the casing will help to prevent the cord from being accidentally pulled free. Drive Belt These are usually the first things to go, and once you crack open the tool it’s a nice easy problem to spot. Belts can get worn and stretched, then they can overheat and end up getting shredded or stripped. You can spot this because the motor will be running but nothing is being driven.  Switch Powerful tools such as circular saws and grinders can wear out their switches quite easily. If you have to jiggle the switch a bit to get the motor to turn, then the switch is on its way out. Contacts can become charred and carbon coated and sometimes simply just need cleaning.  Brushes Some tools, such as grinders and routers, run at high loads and wear out their brushes quickly. Many power tools have snap fits and easy fastening assemblies and so can be opened up quickly and easily. When you have determined where the problem lies, do an online search for a parts diagram of the tool if you don’t have one to hand. From that get the part number and check out some online vendors of power tool spare parts. Why not give it a try?

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