Power Tool Industry – November 2013

 

Innovative research and creative new designs have ensured that 2013 has been a fantastic year for the progress of the power tool industry. So much has happened in the last twelve months that it would be impossible to list all of the new developments. However, here are some of the highlights.
[h2]Lightweight and precise: great new power tools on the market.[/h2]
Some fabulous new high powered tools have been released into the market this year, and many of them were presented for the first time at this year’s Speciality Tools and Fasteners Distributors Association (STFDA) convention. Among the highlights of the convention was a new model of wormdrive saw, the model MAG77LT created by Skil. This model is a significant improvement on previous models of wormdrive in a number of ways. For instance, this highly precise saw will cut a bevel of up to fifty three degrees, and it features rubberised grips for an enhanced ergonomic experience. Also exciting is the feel of this saw – it is predicted to be the lightest wormdrive currently available. The drive to make tools both more powerful and precise and more lightweight was a running theme of the 2013 STFDA convention. Easy to handle hammers and extra accurate drills and bevels numbered among the other highlights at this show.
[h2]Improvements in power tool production systems from MIT.[/h2]
The Massachusetts Institute of Technology is almost always at the cutting edge of research when it comes to science and design. 2013 has been a particularly fruitful year for collaborations between scientists and the power tool industry. Researchers at MIT have created wonderfully precise computerised control systems that not carve blocks of wood, metal, or other material to within a hair’s breadth of even the most intricate design. The really inspiring feature of these new computerised control systems, however, is the fact that they provide real time feedback to the user so that she or he can exercise great control over the design. Rather than setting the machine to ‘go’ and watching it carve out a set pattern, the user can intervene and add extra unique touches and careful changes to the design. Commentators have hailed this research as bringing traditional authentic handicrafts into the twenty first century. It is surely only a matter of time before these amazing developments are integrated with the power tools that we use every day. So, if you thought that 2013 was a momentous year for the power tool industry, just wait and see what the future holds.

Innovative research and creative new designs have ensured that 2013 has been a fantastic year for the progress of the power tool industry. So much has happened in the last twelve months that it would be impossible to list all of the new developments. However, here are some of the highlights.

Lightweight and precise: great new power tools on the market.

Some fabulous new high powered tools have been released into the market this year, and many of them were presented for the first time at this year’s Speciality Tools and Fasteners Distributors Association (STFDA) convention. Among the highlights of the convention was a new model of wormdrive saw, the model MAG77LT created by Skil. This model is a significant improvement on previous models of wormdrive in a number of ways. For instance, this highly precise saw will cut a bevel of up to fifty three degrees, and it features rubberised grips for an enhanced ergonomic experience. Also exciting is the feel of this saw – it is predicted to be the lightest wormdrive currently available. The drive to make tools both more powerful and precise and more lightweight was a running theme of the 2013 STFDA convention. Easy to handle hammers and extra accurate drills and bevels numbered among the other highlights at this show.

Improvements in power tool production systems from MIT.

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology is almost always at the cutting edge of research when it comes to science and design. 2013 has been a particularly fruitful year for collaborations between scientists and the power tool industry. Researchers at MIT have created wonderfully precise computerised control systems that not carve blocks of wood, metal, or other material to within a hair’s breadth of even the most intricate design. The really inspiring feature of these new computerised control systems, however, is the fact that they provide real time feedback to the user so that she or he can exercise great control over the design. Rather than setting the machine to ‘go’ and watching it carve out a set pattern, the user can intervene and add extra unique touches and careful changes to the design. Commentators have hailed this research as bringing traditional authentic handicrafts into the twenty first century. It is surely only a matter of time before these amazing developments are integrated with the power tools that we use every day. So, if you thought that 2013 was a momentous year for the power tool industry, just wait and see what the future holds.

 

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